Unleash the power of 3D
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.. what is your hardware?

I’ve been using Windows 10 for a while now, and it has been really stable. I do use a tech insider x64 build though, on the slow ring, and run a mid age GTX 1060 with Nvidia graphics on Intel chipset. I do have to admit, when I was using AMD graphics cards, I had a lot of issues, eventually with the card dying out not 3 years in (and I remember reinstalling OS, drivers, everything before it ultimately went pixel glitchy and was really evident it was the graphics), but with MSI Nvidia, no problems. Since it’s a DirectX issue, it might be related to graphics hardware or other hardware or driver conflicts – though the issue coming in from an Update might mean it’s OS specific, system files being corrupt?  I know my solutions and experience could be remotely dissimilar…

Also, another issue that might cause this is the CPU  chipset or RAM sometimes. Intel is known not for performance, but stability. I used to use competing chipsets for price over performance, but they have an architectural flaw that when the chip idles, it can crash the system heavily. I have also found, as a result, more stability with Intel processors. That has helped a lot – but digging a little on the internet looking for the dxgkrnl.sys says it either is the drivers, Nvidia surround with multidisplay, or try getting the latest windows update to fix – or ultimately it could be hardware failure, either RAM or CPU. But you’ve done memory checks, disk checks, swapped out the graphics card, reset overclocking of the cpu in bios – if you were using overclocking – turned off hibernating, power saving off to be on full so no energy saving for best performance, did a DX check, done a systems files check, etc?

This link might help, if you haven’t tried it out already. Has a bunch of routine steps for that kernel.
https://www.partitionwizard.com/disk-recovery/dxgkrnl-sys.html

I love swapping out parts when it comes to bluescreens – it demysitifies it quickly: check graphics first, then ram, then harddrives, then ultimately the CPU. Keeping my frankenstein old machines have helped for that… I hope you can find the culprit! It must be there somewhere… :scratch:

:dance: